A Washington, D.C. Townhouse

March 20, 2015No comments

long view of remodeled kitchen in Washington DC townhouse, with refinished oak floors, hot water radiator, double refrigerators, white cabinets, bookshelf on end of center island and professional range and hood

“I want to have big family meals.”  That topped the wish list of the new owner of this Washington DC townhouse. And that was the guiding principle for interior designer Amy Herbert of Aesthetic Answers, a Washington DC art and design studio, through the home’s dramatic kitchen renovation.

“There was no flow at all,” Herbert said of the kitchen as she found it, awkwardly cut off from the living room by a wall and ill-advised peninsula. In pursuit of a dream kitchen for a family that loves to host, entertain, and cook, she and the architects reconfigured the room and opened up the space. Then, in conjunction with CliqStudios designer Angela Nguyen, she went to work creating the kitchen.
<img src=”http://www.cliqstudios.com/images/cliqstudios-dayton-painted-white-custaf-725-b.jpg” alt=”cliqstudios-dayton-painted-white-custaf-725-b” width=”700″ height=”467″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-12772″ style=”padding-bottom:20px” />

The owner’s passion for cooking and feeding large gatherings found expression in an oversized stove, extra pantry space, and a new island in the middle of the kitchen.

“Angela was great with the particulars,” Herbert said of her collaboration with the CliqStudios designer. Nguyen helped Herbert customize the look of the hood over the 48” range, concealing it within the cabinet space so that the outer surface of the hood was flush with the outer surface of the cabinets. Above the hood, they fashioned a decorative panel that meets high glass cabinets on each side.
remodeled kitchen in washington dc townhouse has diagonal subway tile backsplash, white cabinets, stainless hanging pot rack, center island with bookshelf and professional range and hood
On the center island, Nguyen and Herbert maximized function, incorporating a bookshelf for cookbooks on one side, and a narrow cabinet with spice drawers on the other.

On the refrigerator wall, they had to weigh creating one continuous flush surface or bumping one side back. At Nguyen’s suggestion, they pushed the area to the right of the refrigerator back to a standard depth of 12 inches, giving the kitchen more countertop space.

According to Herbert, Angela’s input helped control costs, balancing custom changes with less expensive design decisions. “The owners are thrilled,” she says. “The kitchen looks like everything they envisioned, and functions better than they expected.”

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